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Dr. Guy Fradet

Dr. Guy Fradet

MD, FACS, FRCSC
Cardiothoracic Surgeon
Kelowna, BC
Q:

What happens when you have narrowing in your arteries?

A:

Narrowing in the arteries can happen simply with age, or along with other risk factors (lifestyle, genetics, etc). The plaque that builds up in the arteries can eventually crack or clot, which can ultimately cause a heart attack. You can also experience a lesser version of severity due to the plaque which can come in the form of chest pain, or angina. Finally, there are those people who have some narrowing in their arteries and have no symptoms at all. Your best defense is to visit your physician regularly to ensure your risk factors and heart health are being well monitored.

cabg fradet

CABG - Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

Dr. John Wade

Dr. John Wade

MD, FRCPC
Rheumatologist
Vancouver, BC
Q:

What are the potential side effects of my rheumatoid arthritis medications?

A:

If you are taking anti-inflammatories for your rheumatoid arthritis, there are several side effects you may experience, in varying degrees of severity. Common nuisances are stomach pain, indigestion and heartburn. More rarely, you can have more serious side effects, such as gastrointestinal bleeding. It is important to disclose any medications and vitamins you are taking to your physician or rheumatologist, so they can design the most appropriate medication schedule for you.

wade rhumatoid arthritis side effects

Rheumatoid Arthritis, NSAIDs and Potential Side Effects

Dr. Egidius Stockenstrom

Dr. Egidius Stockenstrom

MD
Family Doctor
Vancouver, BC
Q:

How does a person get a cold sore?

A:

A cold sore, also called a fever blister, happens when an infection breaks out near the mouth that is caused by a virus. The virus is the Herpes Simplex I or II virus, and you can get a cold sore from direct contact with someone who has an outbreak of the virus at that time. There is some new research which shows that the Herpes Simplex virus may be transmitted by someone who has it, even if they aren't having an active outbreak.

cold sore genhealth

What are Cold Sores and Fever Blisters?