Managing Diabetes and Medications

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Managing Diabetes and Medications - Get the Facts

Managing Diabetes and Medications - Get the Facts

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Video transcript

Managing Diabetes and Medications

Duration: 5 minutes 56 seconds

Welcome to this overview of type 2 diabetes medications. This video aims to provide you and your caregiver with a better understanding of the role medications can play in your type two diabetes treatment plan. We'll explain why medications are necessary, how they work, and why you may need more than one type. Remember, you're never alone in your diabetes journey. You and your health care provider will work together to create a plan tailored to your needs. To help you live your best life possible.

Type 2 diabetes is a disease where your body is either unable to make enough insulin or it cannot properly use the insulin it makes. When this happens higher than normal amounts of blood sugar will build up in the bloodstream. High blood sugar also known as hyperglycemia, can be very harmful to blood vessels. Over time, it can lead to serious health problems affecting the eyes, nerves and feet, and it can lead to a higher chance of heart and kidney disease.

Trying to prevent or delay serious health problems is one of the reasons why type 2 diabetes management is so important and why it's necessary to regularly check in with your health care provider. There are many ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This includes healthy behaviors such as regular physical activity and healthy eating, as well as diabetes education, weight and stress management and in most cases, medications.

Medications are often needed to help you meet your personal blood sugar targets. Some medications also have added benefits of protecting you from serious health problems related to your diabetes. Your treatment goals, blood sugar levels, medical history, including how long you've had diabetes and insurance coverage are all factored in when medication is prescribed.

When you're first diagnosed, you may be prescribed several medications or none at all. You may be on a mix of oral or injectable medications including insulin. Your treatment plan will be personalized to what is right for you, and it may change throughout the course of your life. This means that your treatment plan may look very different from your friend or neighbor who also lives with diabetes. Remember taking several medications or needing to change your treatment plan doesn't mean you failed. Medications are there to help you reach your blood sugar targets and keep your body healthy.

Your healthcare provider has many options to choose from when deciding on a medication that's right for you. Their recommendation will be based on your personal needs and how each medication works. Since each medication works differently, you may need to be prescribed more than one.

Metformin is generally one of the first medications prescribed it helps by making the insulin your body creates work more effectively. Metformin also lowers the amount of stored sugar your body releases when it doesn't need it. In addition to Metformin, your healthcare provider might suggest other medications like insulin therapy, insulin secretagogues, such as Meglitonides or Sulfonylureas, SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP-1 receptor agonists DPP-4 inhibitors or Thiazolidinedones.

Insulin is a commonly used therapy that many people with diabetes will be prescribed even at diagnosis. It is used to supplement your body's natural insulin. Insulin is available as an injection and there are many types that vary in how quickly they act in the body and how long they last. The Meglitinides or Sulfonylureas, which are also called insulin secretagogues help your pancreas release more insulin. SGLT-2 inhibitors work in the kidneys by removing extra sugar through your urine. They also protect the heart and kidneys. GLP-1 receptor agonists help your body release more insulin when your blood sugar is high after eating something. GLP-1 receptor agonists also protect the heart and kidneys. DPP-4 inhibitors work by increasing your insulin levels when your blood sugar is high, especially after a meal. They also lower the amount of sugar made in the body. And lastly, we have Thiazolidinediones. Like Metformin, these medications help make the insulin your body creates work more effectively.

While it may feel overwhelming to learn about each medication, it can be helpful to understand why you've been prescribed a certain kind and what that means for your personal treatment goals. Some people can manage their type two diabetes with healthy behaviors alone, but don't feel discouraged if you also need medication. Keep in mind that medications may also be prescribed for other treatment goals like protecting you from heart or kidney disease. If you have any questions about medications for type two diabetes, reach out to your health care provider. You can also learn more by visiting diabetes.ca.

Presenter: Chantal Sayers, Uncategorized, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Uncategorized

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Dr. Bruce Perkins

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Dr. Samantha Sandler

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97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong.. ( 5 participated.)

Managing Diabetes and Medications

Questions
 
True
False
1

Type 2 diabetes is a condition where your body cannot use the insulin it produces effectively enough to control blood sugar levels.

Explanation:

Type 2 diabetes is a disease where your body is either unable to make enough insulin or it cannot properly use the insulin it makes.

2

Having a build up of sugar, or too much sugar in the blood is called hypoglycemia.

Explanation:

High blood sugar also known as hyperglycemia, can be very harmful to blood vessels.

3

Having high blood sugars over time can lead to damage in the body causing serious health problems affecting the eyes, nerves and feet.

Explanation:

Over time, hyperglycemia can lead to serious health problems affecting the eyes, nerves and feet, and it can lead to a higher chance of heart and kidney disease.

4

There are many ways to treat or manage type 2 diabetes, some of which include a healthy diet, regular exercise and stress reduction.

Explanation:

There are many ways to manage type 2 diabetes. This includes healthy behaviors such as regular physical activity and healthy eating, as well as diabetes education, weight and stress management and in most cases, medications.

5

Everyone who get's diagnosed with type 2 diabetes typically gets put onto the same medication plan.

Explanation:

Your treatment plan will be personalized to what is right for you, and it may change throughout the course of your life. This means that your treatment plan may look very different from your friend or neighbor who also lives with diabetes.

6

Insulin is a common treatment people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes take. It is meant to supplement the insulin your body produces.

Explanation:

Insulin is a commonly used therapy that many people with diabetes will be prescribed even at diagnosis. It is used to supplement your body's natural insulin.

7

Do you believe in the concept that food is medicine?

Explanation:

Research shows that dietary habits influence disease risk. While certain foods may trigger chronic health conditions, others offer strong medicinal and protective qualities. Thus, many people argue that food is medicine. Yet, diet alone cannot and should not replace medicine in all circumstances. Do you look at food as if it can be medicine for your disease? If yes would you like more information on this, save the PDF for further conversation with your HCP.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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