Preventing Vision Loss with Anti-VEGF Medications

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 Ophthalmologist, talks about eye treatment with anti-VEGF medications.

 Ophthalmologist, talks about eye treatment with anti-VEGF medications.

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Video transcript

Preventing vision loss with Anti-VEGF medications Dr. David Maberley, MD, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist

Antivascular endothelial growth factor or ‘Anti-VEGF’ injections are a safe and effective way to treat any condition in the eye that involves retinal swelling or growth of new blood vessels, including age related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, or retinal vascular occlusion. They represent one of the biggest advances in ophthalmic care in the last 20 years. This medication is extremely successful in preventing vision loss by preventing new blood vessel growth in these conditions that would otherwise be devastating for patients.

Some patients may ask if these injections can improve their vision. Anti-VEGF treatment can improve vision in about one third (1 out of 3) people who take it. However, for a vast majority (9 out of 10), it doesn’t improve vision but it does at least stabilize it.

In terms of the actual procedure, the anti-VEGF medication is injected into the white area of the eye with a fine needle. The procedure, in most cases, is performed while you are slightly reclined in the office chair and only takes a few minutes, with the injection itself taking less than 10 seconds. Some people may feel mild pain or discomfort, however, most people don’t experience pain during the procedure.

When patients have injections done, there are a few common side effects that may occur, including slight ache or pain in the eye lasting a day or two, temporary floaters which typically clear in about a week, and bruising on the white of your eye that appears red or bloodshot, which should clear in a week or two. The bruising is not usually painful and is typically more alarming for other people who see you.

Like any medical procedure, there are some risks involved, such as infection and an increased intraocular pressure. Fortunately, these two risks are very rare and overall anti-VEGF injections are a very safe treatment.

If you would like more information on anti-vegf injections, please contact your local optometrist or ophthalmologist.

Presenter: Dr. David Maberley, Ophthalmologist, Ottawa, ON

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Preventing Vision Loss with Anti-VEGF Medications

Questions
 
True
False
1

"Anti-VEGF" stands for "antivascular endothelial growth factor."

Explanation:

"Anti-VEGF" stands for "antivascular endoscopic growth factor."

2

Anti-VEGF injections are only used to treat macular degeneration.

Explanation:

Anti-VEGF injections are used to treat age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or retinal vascular occlusion.

3

Anti-VEGF treatment can improve vision in about one-third of the people who take it.

Explanation:

Anti-VEGF treatment can improve vision in about one-third of the people who take it.

4

The anti-VEGF medication is injected into the coloured part of the eye.

Explanation:

The anti-VEGF medication is injected into the white area of the eye with a fine needle.

5

Most people don't experience pain during the procedure.

Explanation:

Some people experience mild discomfort, but most don't find the procedure painful.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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