Get to know type 2 diabetes

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Get to know type 2 diabetes - Managing your blood sugars

Get to know type 2 diabetes - Managing your blood sugars

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Video transcript

Hi there and welcome. If you want to know more about type two diabetes, then you've come to the right place. Whether you've been diagnosed with type two diabetes or you care for someone who has been, you'll find valuable information within this video. We will begin by taking you through the basics of type two diabetes, then we'll discuss why managing blood sugar levels is so important and how this can be done.

Living with type two diabetes can feel overwhelming. But remember, you're not alone in this journey. Your health care provider will be there to help you along the way.

Type Two Diabetes is a condition where your body is either unable to make enough insulin or it cannot properly use the insulin it makes.

Insulin is an important hormone that helps control the amount of glucose also known as sugar in your blood. Sugar is found in foods that contain carbohydrates. When we eat, our body breaks down our food into blood sugar. Once blood sugar enters our bloodstream, a signal is sent to our pancreas to release insulin.

Insulin acts as a messenger to help move blood sugar from the bloodstream to different parts of the body where it can be used for energy. Insulin can also tell the liver to store blood sugar for later use. This helps keep blood sugar in a healthy range when everything runs smoothly. For someone with type two diabetes, this system doesn't quite work like it's supposed to. When the body doesn't make enough insulin or is unable to use insulin properly, higher than normal amounts of blood sugar builds up in the bloodstream. This is called high blood sugar or hyperglycemia.

High blood sugar can be very harmful to blood vessels and over time can lead to serious health problems such as damage to the eyes, nerves and feet.

The heart kidneys and blood vessels to the brain can also be affected, leading to a higher chance of experiencing heart and kidney disease, including heart attack and stroke. The risk of heart disease is higher if you have high blood pressure and high cholesterol along with diabetes, mood and energy levels. Can also be affected by changes in blood sugar levels. Living with type two diabetes can take a toll on your physical and mental health. But don't be discouraged. There are things you can do to keep your blood sugar levels in check which can help delay or even prevent these complications.

Managing type two diabetes is not easy, but you won't be doing it alone. You and your health care provider will work together to achieve your best health possible. You may also have support from family and caregivers to help you in your journey with type two diabetes. Remember, you are in charge of your own health, which is why you'll work together with your healthcare provider to create a personalized treatment plan and set goals for your target blood sugar levels. Your healthcare provider can also offer diabetes related education and support. They can explain how healthy eating regular physical activity, stress management and certain medications can help you achieve and maintain your blood sugar targets. An important part of managing type two diabetes is regularly checking your blood sugar levels, which some people can do at home. This can provide insights into how your daily habits and medications can affect your blood sugar. It will also help your healthcare provider personalize your treatment plan and goals. There are various devices to help you check your blood sugar levels at home. Your health care provider will help you determine when and how often you should check your levels and which monitoring device is best for you.

Aside from at home blood sugar monitoring. Your healthcare provider will also encourage you to have a laboratory blood test called A1C every two to three months. A1C is a measurement of your average blood sugar levels. It gives your healthcare provider a bigger picture of your blood sugar levels over time and how your diabetes is being managed.

Most people with type two diabetes will aim for an A1C target of 7% or less. Others may be given a target of 6.5% or less. It will depend on your personal circumstances and treatment goals. You'll work with your health care provider to set your personal A1C target and help achieve your goals.

Your health care provider will also order other tests to monitor your overall health including your cholesterol and kidney function. They will also regularly check your blood pressure and feet and make sure your eyes and heart stay healthy.

While there is no cure for type two diabetes, early treatment, healthy behaviors and appropriate self care. Guided by your health care provider can help you manage your blood sugar levels and minimize diabetes related health problems.

Please contact your health care provider if you have any questions or concerns. You can also learn more about diabetes by visiting diabetes.ca.

Presenter: Chantal Sayers, Uncategorized, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Uncategorized

Premier Practitioners

Dr. Bruce Perkins

Dr. Bruce Perkins

MD, MPH, FRCPC
Endocrinologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Amish Parikh

Dr. Amish Parikh

MD, FRCPC
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Toronto, ON
Dr. Samantha Sandler

Dr. Samantha Sandler

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97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong.. ( 14 participated.)

Get to know type 2 diabetes

Questions
 
True
False
1

Type Two Diabetes is a condition where your body is either unable to make enough insulin or it cannot properly use the insulin it makes.

Explanation:

Type Two Diabetes is a condition where your body is either unable to make enough insulin or it cannot properly use the insulin it makes.

2

When we eat foods with sugars, a signal is sent from our brains to our pancreas to produce insulin, which is a hormone that helps control the amount of glucose in our blood.

Explanation:

Insulin is an important hormone that helps control the amount of glucose also known as sugar in your blood. Sugar is found in foods that contain carbohydrates. When we eat, our body breaks down our food into blood sugar. Once blood sugar enters our bloodstream, a signal is sent to our pancreas to release insulin.

3

Insulin is the hormone that helps move blood sugar from the bloodstream to different parts of the body where it can be used for energy.

Explanation:

Insulin acts as a messenger to help move blood sugar from the bloodstream to different parts of the body where it can be used for energy. Insulin can also tell the liver to store blood sugar for later use. This helps keep blood sugar in a healthy range when everything runs smoothly.

4

High blood sugars is only dangerous to people who have very high sugars and it only affects the blood vessels of the body.

Explanation:

High blood sugar can be very harmful to blood vessels and over time can lead to serious health problems such as damage to the eyes, nerves and feet.

5

When you have type 2 diabetes you will have to self monitor your blood glucose levels as well as get a test periodically called an A1C test.

Explanation:

Aside from at home blood sugar monitoring. Your healthcare provider will also encourage you to have a laboratory blood test called A1C every two to three months. A1C is a measurement of your average blood sugar levels. It gives your healthcare provider a bigger picture of your blood sugar levels over time and how your diabetes is being managed.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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