Podiatrists

Dr. Jennifer Gerres

Dr. Jennifer Gerres

DPM
Podiatrist
Silver Spring, MD
Dr. Mikel Daniels

Dr. Mikel Daniels

DPM
Podiatrist
Owings Mills, MD
Stuart Berry

Stuart Berry

Podiatrist
Niagara Falls, ON
Gary Boardman

Gary Boardman

MBA, D.pod.M Chiropodist
Podiatrist
Mississauga, ON
Richard Liu

Richard Liu

Chiropodist
Podiatrist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Sheldon Nadal

Dr. Sheldon Nadal

Podiatrist
Toronto, ON
Hartley Miltchin

Hartley Miltchin

BSc., Honors BS, DPM Doctor of Podiatric Medicine
Podiatrist
Toronto, ON
Tony Abbott

Tony Abbott

Podiatrist
Collingwood, ON
Julie Gauvreau, DPM

Julie Gauvreau, DPM

DPM
Podiatrist
Gatineau, QC
Lawrence Kales

Lawrence Kales

DPM, PA
Podiatrist
Spring Hill, FL
S A Schumacher

S A Schumacher

DPM, FACFAS, FASPS, FACFAOM
Podiatrist
Surrey, BC
Dr. Greg Laakmann

Dr. Greg Laakmann

DPM, FACFAS
Podiatrist
Vancouver, BC
Joseph Stern

Joseph Stern

Podiatrist
Vancouver, BC
Dr. Velimir Petkov

Dr. Velimir Petkov

DPM
Podiatrist
Clifton, NJ
Dr. Mohammad Rimawi

Dr. Mohammad Rimawi

(DPM),
Podiatrist
New York, NY
Dr. Howard Green

Dr. Howard Green

B.Sc, D.P.M.
Podiatrist
Surrey, BC
Dr. Sophia Solomon

Dr. Sophia Solomon

Podiatrist
New York, NY
1 - 17 of 17 results

Your feet have a big job every day, supporting your weight and absorbing the shock from every step you take. That’s why it’s essential to take good care of your feet so that they can stay flexible and functional. Each foot has 26 bones and hundreds of ligaments, muscles and tendons. 

Types of Diabetic Foot Problems

People with diabetes may develop diabetic foot problems including diabetic retinopathy (nerve damage) and peripheral vascular disease (reduced blood flow to the feet). One of the main problems in patients with diabetes is decreased circulation. This leads to problems including nerve damage and peripheral vascular problems at the bottom of the feet and fingertips. If the damage gets severe enough, patients can't actually feel the bottom of their feet, so if they step on something that could hurt them, they might not actually feel it.

Prevention & Treatment of Diabetic Foot Problems 

People who have diabetes should be checking their feet every day on a regular basis as a routine to help maintain and prevent complications. Look for specially-designed diabetic socks, which are designed with reinforced toes, no seams and extra padding to help prevent pressure sores that might develop. Hydration is also a very important part of diabetic foot care, so make sure you're moisturizing your feet to avoid cracking of the soles and the heels, which take longer to heal if you have diabetes. If you do develop a diabetic sore, your physician will probably refer you to a specialist, because the wound will slower because of the circulation problems that can arise from diabetes.

Effective blood glucose management is also necessary for optimal foot health. If you have diabetes, it’s important to check your blood sugar levels as prescribed by your doctor. This will determine if you have low or high blood sugar and show you how your medication and lifestyle are affecting your blood sugar levels. The goal of blood glucose monitoring in diabetes is to keep your blood sugar as close to target range as possible in order to prevent diabetes complications.

If you have a foot condition, your physician may refer you to a podiatrist for further diagnosis and treatment. A podiatrist is a physician who focuses on conditions of the feet and lower limbs. Your foot health treatment plan depends on the type and severity of your diabetic foot condition. 

Talk to your endocrinologist if you'd like more information on foot health. 

Visit HealthChoicesFirst.com for more videos and resources on diabetes.

Print this Action Plan and check off items that you want to discuss with your healthcare provider or Pedorthist

  • People with diabetes may develop diabetic foot problems including diabetic retinopathy (nerve damage) and peripheral vascular disease (reduced blood flow to the feet).

  • One of the main problems in patients with diabetes is decreased circulation. This leads to problems including nerve damage and peripheral vascular problems at the bottom of the feet and fingertips.

  • People who have diabetes should be checking their feet every day on a regular basis as a routine to help maintain and prevent complications.

  • Look for specially-designed diabetic socks, which are designed with reinforced toes, no seams and extra padding to help prevent pressure sores that might develop. Hydration is also a very important part of diabetic foot care, so make sure you're moisturizing your feet to avoid cracking of the soles and the heels, which take longer to heal if you have diabetes.

  • Effective blood glucose management is also important in order to avoid diabetes-related complications. If you have diabetes, it’s important to check your blood sugar levels as prescribed by your doctor. This will determine if you have low or high blood sugar and show you how your medication and lifestyle are affecting your blood sugar levels.

Adherence:
Adhering to your medications, prescribed exercises or lifestyle changes (such as dietary changes, smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, etc.) is essential to improving health outcomes successfully. Compliance to any prescribed treatment is the number one thing you can do to ensure positive changes and optimal treatment outcomes.

 

A podiatrist is a doctor who has received specialized training in podiatric medicine (DPM). Podiatrists diagnose and treat conditions of the foot, ankle, and lower leg. Podiatrists treat a wide variety of health conditions, including deformity correction, diabetic foot care, and arthritis. In treating patients a podiatrist can also educate them on bone or soft tissue pain, hammertoe, plantar fasciitis, ingrown toenails, corns, bunions, plantar warts, toenail fungus, skin issues of the feet, and orthotic footwear.

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