Orthopaedic Surgeons

Practitioners By City

Premier Practitioners

Dr. Horacio Yepes

Dr. Horacio Yepes

Orthopaedic Surgeon
WATERLOO, ON
Online Booking
Dr. Bradley Seel

Dr. Bradley Seel

Orthopaedic Surgeon
Ann Arbor, MI
Dr. Rob Nicoletta

Dr. Rob Nicoletta

MD
Orthopaedic Surgeon
Boston, MA
Dr. Ryan Chen

Dr. Ryan Chen

Orthopaedic Surgeon
Canton, GA

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There are many conditions that affect your body's musculoskeletal system, which involves the muscles, ligaments and joints. Orthopedic doctors work in hospitals and specialized practices.

Conditions Orthopedic Doctors Treat

Orthopedic physicians specialize in diagnosing and treating orthopedic injuries and conditions such as:

• Bursitis: The inflammation and swelling of a bursa, a fluid-filled sac that usually forms over the joints. It acts as a cushion between the bones and tendons. The most common cause is repetitive movements.
• Carpal tunnel syndrome: Compression of the median nerve as it travels through the wrist at the carpal tunnel. Symptoms include pain, numbness and tingling in the thumb, index finger and middle finger, as well as in the thumb side of the ring fingers.
• Osteoarthritis: Caused when the cartilage on the ends of the bones wears down. Often, the bones rub against each other, causing pain and swelling. Osteoarthritis is the most common  type of arthritus, affecting millions of people worldwide.
• Rheumatoid arthritis: At first, rheumatoid arthritis usually only attacks a few joints, but over time it affects more, causing joint pain, swelling and stiffness. Many people experience worse RA pain in the morning or after they’ve been sitting or lying down for awhile. 
• Knee, hip and joint pain 
• Osteoporosis: It means “porous bone” and occurs when the body makes too little bone, loses too much bone, or both. Bones weaken and can easily break. 
• Sports injuries 
• Tumours: Abnormal growths found in the bone can be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). 

Orthopedic surgeons also perform hip replacement and knee replacement surgeries due to arthritis. During hip or knee replacement surgery, the surgeon removes the painful joint and replaces it with an artificial joint made from plastic, ceramic and/or metal.

Treatment of Orthopedic Conditions

Orthopedic conditions may be caused by overuse, chronic pain, genetics, or a sudden injury, like a broken bone or a dislocated hip. Some orthopedic conditions can’t be cured, while others can be treated to reduce pain and improve mobility. The treatment your orthopedic doctor recommends will depend on your condition. You may be prescribed the RICE method (rest, ice, compression, elevation), physiotherapy, medication, bracing or orthopedic surgery.

Talk to your family physician if you'd like more information on orthopedic conditions and treatment.

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  • Orthopedic physicians specialize in diagnosing and treating orthopedic injuries and conditions such as bursitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, knee, hip and joint pain, osteoporosis, sports injuries and tumours.

  • Orthopedic physicians specialize in diagnosing and treating arthritis, including osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  • Orthopedic surgeons also perform hip replacement and knee replacement surgeries due to arthritis. During hip or knee replacement surgery, the surgeon removes the painful joint and replaces it with an artificial joint made from plastic, ceramic and/or metal.

  • Orthopedic conditions may be caused by overuse, chronic pain, genetics, or a sudden injury, like a broken bone or a dislocated hip. Some orthopedic conditions can’t be cured, while others can be treated to reduce pain and improve mobility.

  • The treatment your orthopedic doctor recommends will depend on your condition. You may be prescribed the RICE method (rest, ice, compression, elevation), physiotherapy, medication, bracing or orthopedic surgery.

Adherence:
Adhering to your medications, prescribed exercises or lifestyle changes (such as dietary changes, smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, etc.) is essential to improving health outcomes successfully. Compliance to any prescribed treatment is the number one thing you can do to ensure positive changes and optimal treatment outcomes.

An orthopedic surgeon is a surgeon who has taken additional training in the diagnosis and treatment of bone and skeleton-related problems. An orthopedic surgeon may provide more general care or specialize in an area such as sports medicine or pediatrics. Some surgeries that an orthopedic surgeon may perform are hip replacements and bone grafting. When treating a patient an orthopedic surgeon can also help educate them on sports injuries, rheumatoid arthritis, arthroscopy and ACL injuries. Main operating room procedures If you have been scheduled for a procedure in the main operating room, then likely you will have been asked to be fasting from the night before, and to have someone drive you home and be with you for the first 24 hours after surgery. Many procedures are performed after just freezing your arm. If requested, intravenous sedation will be administered so that you may even fall asleep during the procedure. A orthopedic surgeon can treat a use a variety of narcotics are usually prescribed after surgery. Pain management usually starts with maximizing on non narcotics options.  Discontinue the narcotics as soon as you can. An local  orthopedic Surgeon Some procedures that require a surgeon orthopedic or require immobilization after completion. If you do not have a splint or cast after your surgery, you will be asked to keep your dressing on for 48 hours, followed by light bathing and washing of the wound. Do not soak your wound until after your suture have been removed. If your hand has not been immobilized, it is very important to move your fingers from fully straight to fully bent as frequently as possible.

Shoulder arthritis specifically refers to the degeneration of the cartilage in the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder. The shoulder joint is made up of the humerus (upper arm bone) and the scapula (shoulder blade). The ball-shaped head of the humerus fits into the socket-like glenoid cavity of the scapula, forming the shoulder joint.

Over time, the cartilage that covers the ball and socket of the shoulder joint can deteriorate due to various factors such as aging, injury, repetitive stress, or certain medical conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. As the cartilage wears down, the bones may start to rub against each other, causing pain, stiffness, swelling, and reduced range of motion in the shoulder. These symptoms can impact daily activities and decrease the overall function of the shoulder joint.

seful Resources

Canada

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

Canadian Orthopaedic Association

British Columbia

Alberta    

Saskatchewan    

Manitoba

Ontario

Quebec

Newfoundland and Labrador

New Brunswick

Nova Scotia

Prince Edward Island

Yukon    

Northwest Territories

Nunavut

 

United States of America

National Provider Identifier (NPI) 

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

 

Australia

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency

Australian Society of Orthopaedic Surgeons

 

New Zealand

Medical Council of New Zealand

New Zealand Orthopaedics Association

 

United Kingdom

General Medical Council

Royal College of Surgeons of England

 

Ireland

Medical Council

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland

 

South Africa

Health Professions Council Of South Africa

South African Orthopaedic Association

 

India

National Medical Commission

 

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