Dr. Graham Wong, VGH, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC

Dr. Graham Wong, VGH

Dr. Graham Wong, VGH

MD, MPH, FRCPC, FACC, Acute Cardiac Care, VGH
Cardiologist
Vancouver, BC
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Dr. Graham Wong, VGH Bio

Dr. Graham Wong, VGH,Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC attended medical school and completed his internal medicine residency at the University of British Columbia, then completed his fellowship training in cardiology at McGill University.Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC pursued a two-year research fellowship at the Brigham and Women's Hospital with the TIMI Group, with a focus on clinical trials of acute coronary syndromes and completed his MPH at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC is also board certified by the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC is currently the Clinical Director of the Coronary Care Unit at Vancouver General Hospital and is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at UBC.

Dr. Graham Wong, VGH,Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC is the Medical Co-Director of the Regional STEMI Planning Committee for the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority on Acute Coronary Care. Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC is also involved in medical education and sits on the Postgraduate Committee for the UBC Cardiology training program and is an examiner for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC current research interests include risk stratification for acute coronary syndromes and appropriate use of cardiac CT angiography.

Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC MD MPH FRCPC FACC Director, Coronary Care Unit Vancouver General Hospital Regional Medical Lead, Acute Cardiac Care Vancouver Coastal Health Authority/Providence Health Care Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine University of British Columbia

( Dr. Graham Wong, VGH, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC ) is in good standing with the College of Physicians and Surgeons.

If you are looking for local services or treatment in the office or hospital from a Cardiologist, contact a provider such as ( Dr. Graham Wong, VGH ) with this phone number to inquire if they are accepting patients or you need a referral. Phone number to book an appointment 604-875-5735

The speaker in the video may have no association with ( Dr. Graham Wong, VGH, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC ). ( Dr. Graham Wong, VGH, Cardiologist ), may talk about some of the conditions and some of the treatment options shown in the videos on HealthChoicesFirst. Always talk with your health care practitioner about the information you learnt from the videos in regards to treatments and procedures the healthcare practitioner could perform and if they would be appropriate for you. Remember good information is the corner stone to understanding your condition or disease.

Please contact ( Dr. Graham Wong, VGH, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC ) to enquire if this health care provider is accepting new patients.

Education

  • University of British Columbia
    MD, Internal Medicine
  • McGill University
    Cardiology
  • Brigham and Women's Hospital
    Two-year research fellowship
  • Harvard School of Public Health.
    MPH

Recent Health Talks Authored by Dr. Graham Wong, VGH

  • How a Pacemaker Treats an Irregular Heartbeat " Shirley a 75-year-old previously healthy woman"

    Shirley is a 75-year-old previously healthy woman who visits her family doctor with a 2-month history of lightheadedness and weakness. She has no significant past medical history and is currently taking no prescription medications other than an occasional sleeping pill.

    Her physical examination is essentially normal aside from a slow heart rate of 50 beats per minute. She is sent for an ECG which is interpreted as sinus bradycardia with a right bundle branch block and a first degree AV block. Her family doctor arranges for a holter monitor (heart rhythm monitor), which reveals occasional pauses up to 3.5 seconds in duration, which correlate with her symptoms of lightheadedness. On this basis she is referred for an urgent outpatient pacemaker implantation after discussion over the phone with a cardiologist.

    Shirley and her family have a number of questions about what a pacemaker is, what it does, and how it will help her. Shirley is also concerned about the potential danger of the procedure itself as she was told that it would involve a type of surgery.

    Shirley would benefit from some monitoring following her procedure, and should be assigned to a cardiologist for follow-up care. She can also speak with a pharmacist regarding her medications to identify any possible interactions.

  • What is a Heart Attack? " Patrick a 70-year-old diabetic man with a 2-year history of stable chest pain"

    Patrick is a 70-year-old diabetic man with a 2-year history of stable chest pain when he exerts himself. He is awoken from sleep with the acute onset of crushing central chest pain which radiates to his neck and left arm. His normal medications include normally aspirin, a diuretic, a cholesterol-lowering pill and insulin. He is mildly short of breath and also starts sweating profusely. He takes two Tums which fail to relieve his symptoms and his wife calls 911. The ambulance comes within 10 minutes of the 911 call and they perform an in-field ECG. The automatic ECG interpretation reads "Acute anterior wall ST elevation myocardial infarction". The ambulance attendant tells him that he is having a large heart attack which is potentially life-threatening and is being caused by an acute blockage of a major coronary artery by a blood clot that had formed on top of an unstable blockage of cholesterol.

    Patrick is given 2 baby aspirins to chew and swallow and is immediately transported to the nearest hospital for treatment. He is told that the hospital he is going to has the capability of performing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), otherwise known as emergency angioplasty and stunting.

    He has several questions prior to signing his consent form for the procedure, including the risk of the heart attack to his life, the treatment options available to him, and the long term outcomes as a consequence of his heart attack. He also wants to know what will happen to him after he leaves the hospital and what his prognosis will be.

    Patrick would benefit from seeing a cardiologist on a regular basis as well as being involved in a healthy heart program which is often offered through hospitals. He may also benefit from seeing a dietitian to see if he can lower his cholesterol levels through diet. After he is treated and on his way to recovery, he may wish to start a cardiac rehab exercise program to gain back his strength.

  • Increasing Chest Pain and Cardiac Stents " Wayne a 52-year-old man with high cholesterol "

    Wayne is a 52-year-old man with a history of high cholesterol and hypertension. He is referred to a cardiologist for the evaluation of exertional chest pain that has been worsening for 6 months. Walking only 2 blocks on the level reliably precipitated his chest pain. He had no symptoms at rest, and stopping exercise reliably relieved the discomfort.

    A treadmill examination is arranged and is interpreted as being abnormal after 6 minutes of exercise. A trial of medical therapy with a beta blocker and a nitroglycerin patch is attempted, but it fails to relieve his symptoms satisfactorily. Therefore, Wayne is referred for coronary angiography to define his coronary anatomy and possibly perform a revascularization procedure. He is told that a stent may be implanted if a significant blockage is identified. He is concerned about the long-term implications of stent implantation and the need to take blood thinners for an extended period of time. He is also asking how long stents last and if they ever need to be removed.

    Wayne may benefit his condition by further discussion with his cardiologist to address his hypertension and chest pain. A cardiovascular surgeon can discuss the options available to him, such as cardiac revascularization or the use of a stent. If surgery does ensue, a cardiac rehabilitation program will be needed. In the meantime, seeing a nutritionist regarding his cholesterol levels would be good, as well as searching for ways to control any stress he may be experiencing, such as yoga or massage.

Recent Health Talk Comments by Dr. Graham Wong, VGH

  • 28 August 2019
    A Comprehensive Guide on Heart Failure Congestive heart failure (often called heart failure) is a chronic heart condition that occurs when your heart muscle is ineffective at pumping blood. As a result, your body hangs on to salt and water, causing your heart to beat faster and potentially get bigger. Heart failure may be a chronic condition (ongoing) or acute (occur suddenly). Certain conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and coronary artery disease can lead to congestive heart failure. There are a number of treatments for heart failure, and lifestyle changes can help improve your quality of life. Causes of Heart Failure There are a number of conditions that can lead to heart failure; it is most often related to another disease or illness such as: Coronary artery disease. This is the most common cause of heart failure. A previous heart attack resulting from coronary artery disease. High blood pressure. If your heart has to work harder to circulate blood throughout your body, it can make your heart muscle weak or stiff. Diabetes. There is a link between diabetes and heart failure. Cardiomyopathy. Diseases, infections or abuse of alcohol/drugs can cause this condition. Lifestyle factors can increase your risk of heart failure, including smoking, excessive alcohol use and physical inactivity. Type of Heart Failure There are four types of heart failure: Left-sided heart failure, which causes fluid to back up in the lungs. Right-sided heart failure, which causes fluid to back up into your abdomen, feet and legs. Systolic heart failure, which is a pumping problem in the left ventricle. Diastolic heart failure, which is a filling problem in the left ventricle. Symptoms of Heart Failure It’s important to see your healthcare provider for regular checkups, and especially if you're experiencing symptoms of heart failure, which can include: Shortness of breath, especially when you exercise or lie down Chest pain Fatigue Nausea Irregular or rapid heartbeat Weakness Edema (swelling) in your feet, ankles, legs or abdomen Wheezing or cough Lack of appetite Difficulty concentrating Pink-tinged mucus or phlegm Risk Factors for Heart Failure There are many different risk factors for heart failure, including: Coronary artery disease High blood pressure Diabetes and some diabetes medications Heart attack Obesity Viruses Sleep apnea Certain medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Alcohol or drug use Congenital heart defects Smoking There are also complications that can occur as a result of heart failure, including: Heart valve or heart rhythm problems Liver damage from a buildup of fluid that puts pressure on the liver and causes scarring Kidney damage, due to reduced blood flow to the kidneys How to Prevent Heart Failure The best way to prevent heart failure is to make healthy lifestyle changes. This reduces your risk factors. In addition, see your physician regularly and take all medications as prescribed. Some of the lifestyle changes that can prevent heart failure include: Quitting smoking Abstaining from alcohol or limiting your intake Eating a healthy low-fat, low-sodium diet Maintaining a healthy weight Getting regular exercise Effectively managing other conditions such as coronary artery disease and high blood pressure Diagnosing Heart Failure To diagnose heart failure, your physician will perform a physical exam to look for things like congested lungs or fluid buildup. He or she will review your medical history and you’ll have a chance to discuss your symptoms. If your physician thinks you should undergo further testing, he or she may order: Blood tests. This may show conditions that can affect the heart and a chemical called N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). X-rays. An X-ray image of your chest can show the condition of your heart and lungs. Echocardiogram. This test produces a video image of your heart, which can show abnormalities and measure how well your heart is pumping. Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG). Your doctor will attach electrodes to your skin to record the electrical activity of your heart. Cardiac computerized tomography (CT) scan. This machine collects images of your chest and heart while you lie on a table. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This machine produces a magnetic field to create images of your heart. Coronary angiogram. The doctor will insert a thin catheter into a blood vessel (groin or arm), and then guide it into your coronary arteries. Dye is injected into the catheter so that your physician can visualize blockages. Stress tests. Usually, you’ll walk on a treadmill while attached to an ECG machine to measure the effects of exertion on your heart. Treatment of Heart Failure Treatment of your heart failure depends on the type and severity. It’s important to remember that there is no cure for heart failure, but treatment can improve your symptoms and strengthen your heart. There are three main types of treatment for heart failure: medications, devices and surgery. Generally, physicians will prescribe a combination of medications to treat your condition, including: ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme) inhibitors. These drugs are a type of vasodilator, which lower blood pressure and improve blood flow. By widening the blood vessels, ACE inhibitors help you feel better, as there is less stress on the heart. Aldosterone antagonists. Also known as potassium-sparing diuretics, these are often prescribed for patients with severe heart failure symptoms. Angiotensin II receptor blockers. These drugs are often used as an alternative for patients who can’t tolerate ACE inhibitors; they have many of the same benefits. Beta blockers. Another common medication for heart failure, beta blockers reduce blood pressure and slow your heart rate; they may even reverse some heart damage. Digoxin. Also known as digitalis, this medication is used to slow the heartbeat and increase reduce heart failure symptoms. Diuretics (water pills). These are prescribed to prevent you from retaining fluid, which can reduce edema. You’ll probably have to take potassium and magnesium supplements if you take diuretics. Nitrates. These can help reduce chest pain. Statins. You may take statins to lower cholesterol. Some of the devices used to treat heart failure include: Biventricular pacing (also known as cardiac resynchronization therapy). This type of pacemaker sends timed electrical impulses to the heart, improving pumping. This treatment may be combined with an ICD. ICDs (implantable cardioverter-defibrillators). Similar to a pacemaker, an ICD is implanted in your chest, and its wires lead through your veins and into your heart. If your heart stops or begins beating too irregularly, the ICD will get it back into a normal rhythm. Oxygen tanks. Patients with severe heart failure may need to use supplemental oxygen on a regular, long-term basis. VADs (ventricular assist devices). A mechanical pump is implanted into your chest or abdomen to help pump blood from your heart to the rest of your body. These may be used in patients waiting for a heart transplant. If you need surgery to treat heart failure, you may undergo: Coronary bypass surgery. The cardiothoracic surgeon will take blood vessels from your leg, arm or chest to bypass a blocked artery in your heart. Following coronary bypass surgery, blood should flow more freely through your heart. Heart valve repair (or replacement). If you have a faulty heart valve, you may need heart valve repair; if it’s more severe, you may require valve replacement surgery. Heart transplant. If medications, devices or surgery doesn’t help, you may need to have a heart transplant. When Should I Call a Doctor? Heart failure can be life-threatening, so call 911 if you experience any of these signs or symptoms. Too many patients question symptoms or wait to seek emergency treatment, which can lead to further heart damage. Chest pain or tightness in your chest Fainting Severe shortness of breath that comes on suddenly Coughing up pink, foamy mucus Severe weakness If you experience other symptoms of heart failure, such as edema or lack of appetite, contact your doctor or cardiologist. With early diagnosis and treatment for congestive heart failure, it’s possible to live a long, healthy and active life. Talk to your physician about heart failure causes, symptoms, risk factors and treatments. Find more heart health resources at HealthChoicesFirst.com.
  • 07 September 2018
    A cardiac stent is a small, expandable metal or plastic tube that is inserted into a narrowed artery to keep it open. It can also be called a heart stent or coronary stent. To open larger arteries, your surgeon may use a stent graft made of fabric. Usually these blood vessel blockages are caused by a buildup of plaque. You may need an emergency stent if your coronary artery is blocked and/or you suffer a heart attack. The surgeon will place a catheter into the blocked coronary artery, followed by a balloon angioplasty and a stent in the artery. A stent procedure is much less invasive than coronary artery bypass surgery. Generally, recovery after a stent surgery results in less discomfort and a shorter recovery time. Your doctor will usually recommend blood-thinning drugs such as aspirin to prevent blood clots. Before getting a stent, your doctor will tell you not to take any drugs that will make it harder for your blood to clot. During the cardiac stent procedure, the surgeon will make a small incision - usually in the groin or arm - and use a catheter to guide surgical tools through your blood vessels. He or she may use an angiogram to help guide the stent to the broken or blocked blood vessel. Once the stent is placed, the surgeon will close the incision. Most patients remain in the hospital overnight after a heart stent surgery. Many patients are able to return to work after a week, however, often those who have undergone emergency stent surgery take longer to recover. Your physician will recommend no heavy lifting or strenuous activity for a few weeks after surgery.
  • 07 September 2018
    Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat, also called an arrhythmia, that can increase your risk of heart failure, stroke, blood clots and other heart conditions. A normal heart contracts and relaxes to a regular beat, but if you have atrial fibrillation, the atria (upper chambers) beat out of sync with the ventricles (lower chambers). The irregular heartbeat can cause blood to pool in your atria, causing blood clots that travel to your brain and cause a stroke. Possible causes of atrial fibrillation include: • Previous heart attacks • High blood pressure • Congenital heart defects • Coronary artery disease • Viral infections • An overactive thyroid gland Some people with atrial fibrillation have no symptoms. Atrial fibrillation symptoms can include: • Heart palpitations • Shortness of breath • Dizziness • Fatigue • Chest pain Atrial fibrillation isn't usually life threatening, but it is a serious medical condition that requires treatment. If you experience atrial fibrillation symptoms, consult with your doctor. Your physician may recommend an electrocardiogram to diagnose your heart condition. The goal of atrial fibrillation treatment is to restore your normal heart rate and rhythm and prevent blood clots. Your treatment may include medications, electrical cardioversion, a pacemaker or surgery.
  • 07 September 2018
    A cardiac pacemaker is the natural pacemaker of your heart, which controls your heart rate. An artificial pacemaker is a small device that’s surgically placed under the skin of the chest and uses electrical pulses to help control your heartbeat. People with an arrythmia (irregular heartbeat) may require a pacemaker. An arrythmia can be caused by a heartbeat that's too fast (tachycardia) or too slow (bradycardia). An artificial cardiac pacemaker may be implanted temporarily after a heart attack or surgery. Or, you may require a permanent pacemaker to correct an irregular heartbeat. During the minor surgical procedure to implant your pacemaker, the physician will usually place it below the collarbone, and then connect it to the wires that lead to your heart. The device will monitor your heart rhythm and trigger an electrical impulse to correct your heartbeat when needed. Your artificial cardiac pacemaker will need to be replaced every 5 to 10 years. Many of today’s pacemakers can also monitor things like breathing and blood temperature, and can even adjust your heart rate to changes during activity.
  • 22 February 2017
    The way in which a pacemaker is inserted is that there is one or two leads that are inserted through a vein that tracks into the heart, and then the generator where the battery in the computer of the pacemaker is, that is then implanted underneath the skin.

Ratings for Dr. Graham Wong, VGH, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC

  • 5
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    Dr. Wong is amazing! He is down to earth and has a wicked sense of humor!
    Submitted: December 08, 2018
  • 4
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    Have been seeing Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC for AF for three years and have found him to be informative with very good info. Would recommend Dr Wong to anyone.
    Submitted: April 12, 2017
  • 4
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    Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC has been helping my mom for close to two years now with some AF and a slow heart murmur. I cannot say enough good things about DR Wong and all his staff.
    Submitted: February 14, 2017
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    My Father has been treated by doctor Graham Wong for three years for A/F and we have found him to be excellent and we would recommend him to anyone looking for a good cardiologist in Vancouver
    Submitted: January 20, 2017
  • 5
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    Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist, Vancouver, BC has been treating my mother for two years and we find him excellent.
    Submitted: January 20, 2017
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    Dr. Graham Wong the Cardiologist at VGH in Vancouver, BC recently saw my father for his heart condition and was excellent. He took the time to give us information and seta course with a nutritionist. Over all very impressed with his treatment and information.
    Submitted: August 13, 2016
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    Visited Dr. Graham Wong, Cardiologist to discuss how dependable is my pacemaker as it was first installed over two years ago. Dr Wong told me it appeared by all the signs that it was working well and I would not have any issue for the foreseeable time.
    Submitted: February 06, 2016
  • 5
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    Recently was referred to Dr Graham Wong for high blood pressure and an elevated heart rate. He took the time to really understand my lifestyle issues and concerns over travel schedule that dictated a lot of airline travel. Dr Wong referee me to a local personal trainer who got we an exercise routine I could take on the road with me.
    Submitted: February 03, 2016
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    I recently visited my cardiologist Dr. Graham Wong about the side effects of blood thinners and ace Inhibitors and he showed me a video that I could watch that he created, Brilliant and was thankful for the educational content.
    Submitted: January 28, 2016
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    Was referred to Dr. Graham Wong to discuss how dependable is a pacemaker in relation to an upcoming operation I was schedule to have in regards to a pacemaker being inserted in my chest. Was extremely impressed with Dr Wong and his understanding of my upcoming operation.
    Submitted: January 27, 2016
  • 4
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    Dr. Graham Wong a cardiologist at VGH in Vancouver helped me understand the harm in smoking and the risks to both my heart and my health.
    Submitted: January 27, 2016
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    Found Dr. Graham Wong to be an excellent Cardiologist VGH who has helped me with my AF for almost two years now. Would recommend DR Wong to anyone looking for a god Cardiologist in Vancouver at VGH to anyone.
    Submitted: January 24, 2016
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    I saw Dr. Wong for my atrial fibrillation that I've had for some time. He is very easy to talk to and seems to really know his stuff. I have been very happy with Dr. Wong and would recommend him to anyone looking for a great cardiologist.
    Submitted: January 21, 2016
  • 5
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    I recently saw Dr. Wong for the first time at Vancouver General Hospital. My physician felt I needed to see him based on an suspicious echo cardiogram. I found Dr. Wong to be gracious, polite and extremely informative. He answered all of my questions, provided me with information to take home, as well as directing me to this website to view his educational video dashboard on heart health topics. I would recommend Dr. Wong to anyone seeking a great cardiologist.
    Submitted: January 14, 2016
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    Was lucky enough to get a referral to Dr. Graham Wong a Cardiologist at VGH in Vancouver fro my heart condition and I could have not been more lucky. He was attentive and gave me some great information upon my condition. Would recommend him to anyone looking for a good cardiologist.
    Submitted: January 14, 2016
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    Found Dr Graham.Wong to be attentive and a good listener. He had good suggestions on a plan of action and provided me with good educational information on my AF
    Submitted: January 14, 2016
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    Found Dr Graham Wong to be a.very good cardiologist. I was referred by my family doctor and I could not be more.happy. gave me a.good plan and good material on my condition.
    Submitted: January 13, 2016

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