Treating Parkinson's Disease

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Dr. Dean Johnston, MD, MHSc, FRCPC, Neurologist, discusses treating Parkinson's disease.

Dr. Dean Johnston, MD, MHSc, FRCPC, Neurologist, discusses treating Parkinson's disease.

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Video transcript

Featuring Dr. Dean Johnston, MD, MHSc, FRCPC, Neurologist

Duration: 1 minute, 28 seconds

Presenter: Dr. Dean Johnston, Neurologist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Neurologist

Premier Practitioners

Dr. Oksana Suchowersky

Dr. Oksana Suchowersky

Neurologist
Edmonton, AB
Dr. Ramesh Sahjpaul

Dr. Ramesh Sahjpaul

MD, MSc, FRCSC
Neurosurgeon
Vancouver, BC
Dr. Jason Jeremy Sinclair Barton

Dr. Jason Jeremy Sinclair Barton

Neurologist
Vancouver, BC

97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong... ( 108 participated.)

Quiz: Do You Understand Parkinson's Disease?

Questions
 
True
False
1

Parkinson's typically affects patients over the age of 60.

Explanation:

Parkinson's typically affects patients over the age of 60, although it can affect younger patients.

2

Parkinson’s disease symptoms always start suddenly.

Explanation:

Parkinson’s disease symptoms often start slowly, beginning with a barely noticeable tremor in one hand or a lack of expression on your face.

3

Stooped posture is a symptom of Parkinson's disease.

Explanation:

Over time, people with Parkinson’s disease may experience symptoms such as more severe tremors, stiffness, slurred speech, stooped posture, slowed movement, changes in writing and muscle rigidity.

4

There are specific diagnostic tests that will confirm the diagnosis.

Explanation:

The diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is usually made by a neurologist, based on a history and physical examination. There are no specific diagnostic tests that will confirm the diagnosis. When an individual presents with characteristic findings and features of the disease and responds to dopaminergic medication or replacement of dopamine, it's usually enough to confirm the diagnosis.

5

Parkinson’s disease medications that increase or substitute for dopamine can help patients manage tremors and movement problems.

Explanation:

Parkinson’s disease medications that increase or substitute for dopamine can help patients manage tremors and movement problems. Dopamine agonists are drugs that mimic dopamine and act on dopamine receptors to facilitate movement and reduce symptoms.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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