Intravitreal Eye Injection Treatments

Dr. Michael Kapusta, MD, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, discusses what intravitreal eye injections are effective for when treating certain eye diseases linked to vision loss.

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Dr. Michael Kapusta, MD, FRCSC, Ophthalmologist, discusses what intravitreal eye injections are effective for when treating certain eye diseases linked to vision loss.
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Featuring Dr. Michael Kapusta, MD, FRSCS, Ophthalmologist

Duration: 2 minutes, 17 seconds

Patients are often required to have intravitreal eye injections of anti-VEGF medications in order to treat diabetic macular edema, vein occlusion - either branch or central vein occlusion, or age-related macular degeneration.

There are three products that are used, and it is best that your surgeon determines which one will work best in your case. These drugs are injected in the office setting, with the patient having some topical anaesthesia, a speculum placed in their eye, and the drug placed into their eye by the doctor.

Patients who require intravitreal injections of anti-VEGF medication will learn that there are three basic drugs that are used at this point in time. One is bevacizumab, another is ranibizumab, and the third, by timeline, is aflibercept.

All three drugs are potent and effective. These three drugs have different capacities, and may be more indicated in a particular patient’s disease state. Your doctor will be the best person to determine which of these drugs most suits your needs.

Patients are often concerned that an injection of material into their eye will be a painful or scary procedure. In fact, after the first or second injection, patients become quite at ease with the idea that they will have these injections, and they are motivated by the fact that they do often see improvement of their visual acuity very quickly after these injections are started.

When we as a retina community began to inject patients for diabetes, vein occlusion and macular degeneration, we thought this would be a one- or two-year process. The studies in fact were 24 months. Over time we’ve learned that in some cases we need to extend that period to many years. There are patients who will only need a few years of treatment, but many patients need lifelong monitoring, and in some cases, lifelong treatment with intravitreal injections.

Presenter: Dr. Michael Kapusta, Ophthalmologist, Montreal, QC

Local Practitioners: Ophthalmologist

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.