Pars Plana Vitrectomy to Treat Retinal Detachment

Dr. Michael Kapusta, MD, FRSCS, Ophthalmologist, talks about retinal detachment and pars plana vitrectomy as a treatment.

Loading the player...

Dr. Michael Kapusta, MD, FRSCS, Ophthalmologist, talks about retinal detachment and pars plana vitrectomy as a treatment.
2241 Views
Share
Video transcript

Featuring Dr. Michael Kapusta, MD, FRSCS, Ophthalmologist

Duration: 1 minutes, 46 seconds

The repair of retinal detachment with pars plana vitrectomy implies an operation in the operating room, which is typically performed under local, or in some cases, under general anesthesia. The operation involves placing instruments inside the eye and removing the vitreous.

At the conclusion of retinal detachment repair, your surgeon will place a gas bubble in the eye. Gas bubbles can last in the eye from weeks to several weeks – somewhere between two and four weeks typically, depending on the type of gas chosen by your surgeon.

This will imply the need to keep your head in a particular position during the days to weeks after your operation. Many patients when told of the need to keep their head in a particular position ask “How will I do this, doctor?”

In order to achieve optimal results with retinal detachment repair, patients will require particular positioning. There are companies that provide and can sell or lease to you equipment that will facilitate your recovery by ensuring that you maintain the position that your surgeon requires for your repair.

After pars plana vitrectomy to repair the retinal detachment, there are certain restrictions. In addition to the head position, one cannot be at an elevation of higher than 3,000 feet or airplane travel. These are strict restrictions as the gas bubble that is in your eye will expand and cause pressure problems if one does not heed these restrictions.

In regards to restrictions after pars plana vitrectomy, it is best to follow your surgeon’s advice.

Presenter: Dr. Michael Kapusta, Ophthalmologist, Montreal, QC

Local Practitioners: Ophthalmologist

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.