Weight Loss Tips " Mary a 42 year old lawyer referred by her family physician for an exercise program"

Case study ( 4472 views as of July 22, 2019 )

Mary is a 42 year old lawyer. She was referred by her family physician to an exercise program after she expressed a need to get her growing weight issues under control. Mary is 5 foot 2 inches and 150 lbs which indicates a BMI of 27.4, and is considered very overweight. A female of this height should aim to be between 110 - 120 lbs to have a BMI within 'normal' limits.

Mary has had an ongoing battle with weight and now that she is sitting 10-12 hours a day it is becoming even greater. She is worried about heart issues due to her weight gain and general lack of fitness. She complains of how little time she has to exercise and also finds it hard to eat well, eating out or grabbing quick meals that often involve fast food.

The personal trainer recommends to Mary that she start an exercise program immediately so that it can't be put off any longer. Mary is also referred to a nutritionist for education on food choices and to give her some ideas on healthy alternatives. It is also recommended that Mary get a bike for weekends and can get it adjusted properly by a qualified bike fitter if necessary.

Mary can also be referred to a cardiologist to have any heart issues or concerns checked out. She can also consider doing yoga or pilates on weekends to reduce stress levels, improve her strength and help with her with weight loss.

Author:
26

Conversation based on: Weight Loss Tips " Mary a 42 year old lawyer referred by her family physician for an exercise program"

Weight Loss Tips " Mary a 42 year old lawyer referred by her family physician for an exercise program"

  • It's amazing how small life changes can impact your weight and make weight loss harder. Being in a job where you are essentially sedentary makes it even more important to find the time for exercise.
    Flag as inappropriate
    • It also means your workout is done and you don't have to try and find time later in the day
      Flag as inappropriate
    • Exercising before work helps to get you system burning.for the entire day.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • Can she work exercise into her day by commuting by bike?
    Flag as inappropriate
    • If she can't bike to work but commutes by transit she could end her commute at an earlier stop and walk the remaining distance to work.
      Flag as inappropriate
    • Cycling is a great way to get cardiovascular strength training while cycling to and from work. Cycling especially in spring and summer months is not only great exercise but its nice to be outside in the fresh air. Make sure you take the time to check your air pressure in your wheels and if are you in doubt about your bike set up for optional posture and strength check with someone qualified in bike set up.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • She is working so much, that she should consider ways to be healthier at/during work, not just in her off hours. I would think about getting a desk set-up where she can stand for part of her day. I've also heard of people having walking meetings - if she will be having a conversation with a colleague for 30 minutes, why not walk and talk? If she is on conference calls, she could pace while listening. There are apps that can remind you to stand up and go get a drink of water or something, so that you don't get so consumed that you realize 3 hours have passed and you haven't moved.
    Flag as inappropriate
    • If cost isn't an issue - there are companies that will provide you with three healthy meals a day. They deliver them to your house daily and cost less than eating out for each meal
      Flag as inappropriate
    • Also, if she brings food to work, she will be eating healthier than any take-out. She could keep a bag of apples, a bag of salad, some hard boiled eggs and some nuts at work, and be set for a week of healthy lunches.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • Mary seems like a busy person, perhaps she could start walking on her lunch hours rather then try to fit a gym visit in at the end of the day. It would help with losing weight.
    Flag as inappropriate
    • Kudos to you on the early wake up and work out regime. It is hard to incorporate exercise into the daily routine. I have recently received a step counter and find I am striving for more steps per day. Using light weights is contributing to the toning and weight loss. Summer months are much easier than the winter ... any suggestions on how to stay fit during the winter months ?
      Flag as inappropriate
    • I've started getting up at 5am to workout before work. It's hard to get in to the habit but it feels so productive to just have it done.
      Flag as inappropriate
    • I have been walking 30 mins each morning after dropping my son off at school. In addition to this 30-45 mins each evening. I have found in the last few weeks I have more energy and I am maintaining my weight. This past week I was so happy as the inches are coming off and I dropped a few pounds. Walking is a big help for me.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • I am surprised a cardiologist would see someone just because they were overweight.
    Flag as inappropriate
    • Being overweight and having a large waistline significantly increases your risk for heart disease. I think being referred to a cardiologist in this case is a proactive step to ensure that Mary's cardiac health is considered.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • I don't like to base weight loss regimes on BMI. A healthy diet and regular exercise is important and good for everyone, regardless of weight. Perhaps Mary would get a more accurate picture of her health by staying away from the scale and using a tape measure to measure things like her waist.
    Flag as inappropriate
    • I agree that there are more ways to assess health then simply BMI
      Flag as inappropriate
    • I agree. A fitness test and other measures of health would better tell her where she is weight wise and where she needs to be.
      Flag as inappropriate
    • I agree @Joy. The BMI is a good gauge, however does not give us an accurate representation of body type. If Mary further develops her muscle mass, this will help her weight loss efforts but she may not reach that 110-120lb range. She could still have a very health weight but have a weight of 125lbs, for example.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • Losing weight is so hard. I've consulted a dietitian and walked away feeling like I had more questions than answers or suggestions. What is the difference between a dietitian and a nutritionist ?
    Flag as inappropriate
    • The difference between a dietician and nutritionist varies in different provinces and states.
      Flag as inappropriate
    • There are so many credentials and types of professionals out there @K.Michael. A registered dietitian is a great resource, however there are also many types of exercise professionals who are well trained in nutrition as well. What were your main concerns when consulting with the dietitian you saw?
      Flag as inappropriate
    • Great question! I would be interested in the answer too!
      Flag as inappropriate
    • I had the same experience and it left me at a lose of how to proceed. Weight loss is never easy but when you seek guidance and come away more confused it can get very frustrating.
      Flag as inappropriate
  • Losing weight is never easy, however having a plan in place helps. Trying to plan out meals and not eat fast food as much will help with better nutrition. Starting slowly with an exercise routine will help Mary get on the road to better eating and exercise. Baby steps will assist and having a nutritionist will help with ideas and make it easier.
    Flag as inappropriate
    • I agree that keeping it simple is the best way. Having something simple but nourishing to eat is her best bet for weight loss in a busy lifestyle.
      Flag as inappropriate