What is a Sports Hernia and How is it Diagnosed?

Timothy Muller, BSc. PT, M Manual Therapy, Physiotherapy, discusses sports hernia symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

Loading the player...

Timothy Muller, BSc. PT, M Manual Therapy, Physiotherapy, discusses sports hernia symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.
117047 Views
Share
Video transcript

Featuring Tim Miller, BSc PT, M Manual Therapy, Physiotherapist, Marpole Physiotherapy Clinic

Duration: 2 minutes, 12 seconds

A sports hernia is a strain of the deeper abdominals or the lower abdominals or the abductors, and they all attach to the pelvis.

And what happens is that over time, when there is too much pulling on either the lower abdominal or the abductor, pain starts occurring. And with that pain, also weakness in the area, which allows too much pressure from the deeper abdominals on that structure.

There are certain tests that your physiotherapist can do. One of those tests is a length test for the abductor in which he places the leg in a certain position and measures the distance from the knee to the table.

Depending on how severe the problem is, most sports hernias recover within six weeks. After that, there's still a period of time in which they have to train and re-strengthen the core in order to not have a reccurrence.

If people think they have a sports hernia, they should visit their doctor or physiotherapist.

Presenter: Mr. Timothy Muller, Physiotherapist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Physiotherapist

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.