Types of Surgery for Hearing Loss

Dr. Jane Lea, MD, FRCSC, Otologist/Neurotologist, Paediatric Otolaryngologist discusses diagnosis and treatment for the types of surgery for hearing.

Loading the player...

Dr. Jane Lea, MD, FRCSC, Otologist/Neurotologist, Paediatric Otolaryngologist discusses diagnosis and treatment for the types of surgery for hearing.
18033 Views
Share
Video transcript

Featuring Dr. Jane Lea, MD, FRCSC, Otologist/Neurotologist, Paediatric Otolaryngologist
Duration: 1 minute, 45 seconds
Video Title: Types of Surgery for Hearing Loss
The most common surgical procedures we perform for hearing loss is, starting at the most simple kind, such as fluid behind the ear. 

Typically, what we do is we perform something called a myringotomy and tympanostomy tube placement. That involves putting a cut in the eardrum and inserting a tube, so that we can remove that fluid from that area, and that'll improve hearing.

The second most common operation we do is for a hole in the eardrum, so that's called a tympanic membrane perforation. And that's a tympanoplasty or myringoplasty, and that just involves patching the eardrum. Sometimes, we can do that in the office. Sometimes, we have to go the operating room to do that.  

The third most common one is something called an ossicular chain reconstruction. And that's typically when there's a problem with the ear bones in the middle ear. And we essentially go in, and we recreate your ear bones by putting certain prostheses in.

The majority of ear procedures go very well and are low-risk. Having said that, it depends on the type of pathology, and determining the risk will be individualized.  

Whenever we're operating on the ear, there are very important structures that run in the ear. Whoever made us decided to put the nerve that moves your face, called the facial nerve, through your ear. 

The other thing that runs through your ear is a nerve of taste, so that's also at risk. Anytime we operate on the ear, the brain's also very close by. And you could get brain fluid or CSF leaking.  

The other thing that always you need to be warned about is having a complete hearing loss or any balance problems after surgery. So it's not to be taken lightly. There are risks; however, in the majority of cases, things go very well.

If you think you have hearing loss, or you have any questions or concerns, you should contact your local audiologist or your local physician.  

Presenter: Dr. Jane Lea, Otolaryngologist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Otolaryngologist

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.