Shoulder Dislocation in Sports

Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses shoulder dislocations in hockey.

Loading the player...

Larissa Roux, MD FRCP Dip Sport Med, MPH, PhD, discusses shoulder dislocations in hockey.
176248 Views
Share
Video transcript

Featuring Dr. Larissa Roux, MD, MPH, PhD, CCFP, Dip Sport Med

Duration: 1 minute

A shoulder dislocation refers simply to the dislocation of the arm bone or humeris from its socket or its normal place. Shoulder dislocations are the most common kind of dislocation in the body, and our our shoulders sacrifice stability at the expense of being very mobile joints.

Generally it will require pain medication, muscle relaxants and to be safe, X-ray imaging to ensure that there's no associated injury. Immediately following that, patients will have to have their shoulder immobilized and the normal protocol of rest, ice compression would follow.

In the case of traumatic shoulder dislocation, particularly in athletes who engage in contact sports, a referral to an orthopedic surgeon is certainly indicated as surgery may be required to prevent reinjury. If you have any further questions please don't hesitate to contact your local physician or primary care sports medicine physician.

If you have questions about shoulder dislocation, contact a local sports medicine physician.

Presenter: Dr. Larissa Roux, Sports Medicine Physician, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Sports Medicine Physician

97-100 People got two or more of these video questions wrong... ( 9 participated.)

Do You Understand Shoulder Surgery?

Questions
 
True
False
1

The usual treatment for shoulder injuries is surgical options.

Explanation:

The usual treatment for shoulder injuries is non-surgical options such as medications, bracing and physiotherapy. Shoulder surgery is generally only explored if the non-operative options fail.

2

Arthroscopic shoulder surgery is often performed to repair soft tissue injuries.

Explanation:

Arthroscopic shoulder surgery (otherwise known as keyhole surgery) can be a good option for some patients. It is often performed to repair soft tissue injuries, and enables surgeons to introduce a fiber optic camera through a two- to three- millimeter incision.

3

For more severe shoulder injuries, surgeons may recommend a reverse shoulder replacement surgery.

Explanation:

Arthroscopic shoulder surgery (otherwise known as keyhole surgery) can be a good option for some patients. It is often performed to repair soft tissue injuries, and enables surgeons to introduce a fiber optic camera through a two- to three- millimeter incision.

4

For more severe shoulder injuries, surgeons may recommend a reverse shoulder replacement surgery.

Explanation:

For more severe shoulder injuries, surgeons may recommend a reverse shoulder replacement surgery. It is often done to repair rotator cuff tendons that have been damaged, often by arthritis.

5

Patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations may won't benefit from surgical reconstruction, only from non-surgical options.

Explanation:

Patients with recurrent shoulder dislocations may benefit from surgical reconstruction of the damaged tissues in the shoulder joint. This usually involves an arthroscopic day procedure, where the surgeon identifies the torn labrum or ligaments that have occurred with each shoulder dislocation.

6

Following shoulder surgery, most patients will benefit from physiotherapy.

Explanation:

Following shoulder surgery, most patients will benefit from physiotherapy to get their range of motion back, decrease pain and increase strength.

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

QA Chat