PCI (Stent) Surgery: Important Post-Operative Information

Serena Liang, MN, NP - Adult, Nurse, goes over important post-operative details for patients who have had PCI (Stent) surgery. Southlake Regional Health Centre

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Serena Liang, MN, NP - Adult, Nurse, goes over important post-operative details for patients who have had PCI (Stent) surgery. Southlake Regional Health Centre
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Video transcript

Featuring Serena Liang, MN, NP - Adult, Nurse

Duration: 2 minutes, 29 seconds

To prevent a blood clot from forming in the stents that you received, your interventional cardiologist is going to prescribe antiplatelet medicines such as aspirin, Plavix, Ticagrelor or Prasugrel. Don’t stop the medications without talking to your cardiologist, in order to prevent a stent thrombosis happening.

Before you are discharged home, be familiar with how your puncture site looks. The puncture site should be soft, dry and flat. If you notice significant bruising, bulging, firm to touch, swelling, redness, drainage are not normal. If you have any of these signs present, you should seek medical attention.

Cold, pale, blue or painful leg or arm could be a sign of compromised circulation. This is a medical emergency. You should seek medical attention immediately. To prevent infections, you should not submerge your puncture site into water, such as a bathtub, hot tub or swimming pool for three days after the PCI procedure.

If you experience chest pain, stop what you’re doing, sit down or lie down. If you have a nitroglycerin spray prescription, give yourself a spray of nitroglycerin under your tongue every five minutes. Maximum dosage: three doses. If you still have chest pain after the third dose of nitroglycerin you should call 911. Do not drive yourself to the hospital or allow your family to drive you.

It is not recommended for you to drive for 48 hours after your elective PCI procedure. You should make an appointment to see your family physician within one week so that your family physician can check your puncture site and check your bloodwork. If you have a cardiologist, make an appointment to follow up with your cardiologist in four to six weeks.

If you have any more questions, speak with your family physician or your cardiologist.

Presenter: Serena Liang, Nurse, Newmarket, ON

Local Practitioners: Nurse

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.