Asthma and COPD Treatment With Inhalers

Colin Holyk, BSc (Pharm) Pharmacist, discusses Asthma and COPD Treatment With Inhalers

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Colin Holyk, BSc (Pharm) Pharmacist, discusses Asthma and COPD Treatment With Inhalers
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Featuring Colin Holyk, BSc (Pharm) Pharmacist
Asthma and COPD Treatment With Inhalers
Video Title: Asthma and COPD Treatment With Inhalers Duration: 2 minutes, 16 seconds

Regarding patients who have difficulties with breathing - perhaps they’re asthmatic or they are COPD patients - there’s a number of different inhalers available to help them with their breathing.

The first type of inhaler would be a bronchodilator inhaler, and the bronchodilator inhalers are used to basically open up the airways to the lung, to get more air in and out of the lung. That would be a style of the bronchodilator.

A second kind of medication by inhaler is a straight corticosteroid, and these medications are used to reduce the inflammation and swelling in the lung and reduce the secretions of mucous in the lung to allow better air exchange in the lung.

The third type of an inhaler is actually one that is a combination and this contains a corticosteroid to reduce the inflammation and swelling, and also a long-acting bronchodilator which is used on a regular basis so it’s a two-in-one combination.

So the bronchodilator inhaler would be a benefit for patients who have been recently diagnosed with some breathing difficulties, or if they’ve had a cold or a flu and they’ve had some breathing difficulties.
It’s also used for patients with exercise-induced asthma, prior to exercising, if they take a dose of this medication it will help open up their airways.

For patients who have a longer standing difficulty with breathing the doctor may prescribe a steroid medication, a corticosteroid, and use that sometimes in addition to the bronchodilator.

The corticosteroid will help reduce the inflammation and swelling in the lung. The patient might still require the bronco bronchodilator for what we call rescue, for their breathing, to open up the airways.
The third type of medication that we described is a combination of the long-acting bronchodilator and the steroid.

So you’re getting the benefit of reduced inflammation and swelling in the lung tissue. You’re getting the benefit of a long acting bronchodilator to keep the airways open, and patients might be on that. They also may still require that short acting bronco just to open up the airways if they’re acutely in trouble.

Presenter: Mr. Colin Holyk, Pharmacist, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Pharmacist

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.