How to Increase Your Chances of Getting Pregnant

Dr. Karen Buhler, family physician, discusses ways to increase your chances of getting pregnant.

Loading the player...

Dr. Karen Buhler, family physician, discusses ways to increase your chances of getting pregnant.
11654 Views
Share
Video transcript

Featuring Dr. Karen Buhler, MD, CCFP

Duration: 1 minute, 12 seconds

If you're thinking about getting pregnant, you want to keep track of your periods.

Write down the first day of each period and keep track, then you can start to figure out when you'll ovulate.

Most women ovulate 14 days before their period starts so you have to actually count backwards. This isn't very useful moving forward to try to get pregnant. But if you're periods are regular you can start to predict when your ovulation time will be, which is generally the middle of the month.

Signs that you're about to ovulate are that your breasts might get tender or the vaginal discharge can change, from being rather dryish and white to being sticky and clear like a jelly. That lasts usually for about three days in the middle of the cycle, and if you notice those changes, that's the time you should be having sex.

Now there are many things to be thinking about while youre trying to get pregnant. One is mainly are you taking any medications? Some medications are not safe in pregnancy and some medications should not be stopped suddenly in pregnancy, so you should definitely see your care provider as soon as possible when your thinking about getting pregnant and check all these things.

If you have questions about how to get pregnant, contact a local family physician, obstetrician or midwife.

Presenter: Dr. Karen Buhler, Family Doctor, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Family Doctor

This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.