How do you treat Impacted Wisdom Teeth

Dr. Perry Trester, DMD, FRCD (C), FADSA, FICD, FACD, discusses wisdom teeth.

Loading the player...

Dr. Perry Trester, DMD, FRCD (C), FADSA, FICD, FACD, discusses wisdom teeth.
15690 Views
Share
Video transcript

Featuring Dr. Perry Trester, DMD, FRCD (C), FADSA, FICD, FACD

Duration: 3 minutes, 30 seconds

Impacted wisdom tooth is a tooth that does not have enough room to erupt in the mouth and so it is stuck in a position that generally requires surgical removal and that tooth is commonly found in the back part of the jaw in behind the last molar, usually not visible in the mouth because it is impacted.

This surgery results in the jaw being sore for approximately three to four days with the potential for some swelling and bruising and a necessity for softer diet, although with contemporary medications these things are certainly well controlled.

One major tip I might share with you is the fact that this is a procedure best done in patients who are in their late teens, early twenties because the surgical procedure is easier and the recovery is much more rapid.

Trauma to the face often occurs as a result of an accident, commonly affects the teeth and the jawbone. It usually can result in the jawbone being fractured, broken and is very important to be treated properly in order to reestablish the bite, which is commonly disturbed. The oral surgeon is very active in this area of management and should be involved in treating patients who have this problem.

The recovery of a broken jaw can take an extended period of time depending on of course the degree of involvement of the teeth and the jawbones. Usual recovery can entail somewhere between two and four weeks.

Impacted wisdom tooth is a tooth that does not have enough room to erupt in the mouth so it is stuck in a position that generally requires surgical removal and that tooth is commonly found in the back part of the jaw in behind the last molar, usually not visible in the mouth because it’s impacted.

This surgery results in the jaws being sore for approximately three to four days with the potential for some swelling and bruising and the necessity for a softer diet, although with contemporary medications these things are certainly well controlled.

One major tip I might share with you is the fact that this is a procedure best done in patients who are in their late teens or early twenties because the surgical procedure is easier and the recovery is much more rapid.

Tumors of the mouth are quite common; they can be of course benign or malignant, more commonly benign. They are usually dealt with a surgical removal and as such commonly referred to an oral surgeon.

It is a procedure that is confined usually to the mouth, requires some surgery. The recovery period is two to three days with some potential for some pain and swelling and difficulty in chewing, although most patients are back to normal within a short period of time.

Surgical sedation is a safe, pleasant way of putting our patients to sleep in an office setting. We use it of course because of high anxiety and patients' apprehension towards a surgical procedure and so a valuable tool for me to perform surgical procedures with patients at ease.

Presenter: Dr. Perry Trester