Dr. Alan Low, Pharmacist, Vancouver, BC

Dr. Alan Low

Dr. Alan Low

BSC (Pharm), PharmD, ACPR, FCSHP, CCD, RPh
Pharmacist
Vancouver, BC
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Dr. Alan Low Bio

Dr. Alan Low, Pharmacist, Vancouver, British Columbia

Alan Low is a registered pharmacist who also completed an accredited hospital pharmacy residency. He graduated with a doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of British Columbia.

Dr. Low has a wide range of experience in various sectors: direct patient care in hospitals and clinics, academics, research, health care consulting and pharmaceutical industry perspective. He has presented at local and international conferences and is a Fellow of the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists, Clinical Associate Professor in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science at the University of British Columbia and former Chief Operating Officer at Network Healthcare.

If you are looking for local services or treatment in the office or hospital from a Pharmacist, contact a provider such as ( Dr. Alan Low ) with this phone number to inquire if they are excepting patients or you need a referral. Phone number to book an appointment (604) 261-0333

The speaker in the video may have no association with ( Dr. Alan Low, Pharmacist, Vancouver, BC ). ( Dr. Alan Low, Pharmacist ), may talk about some of the conditions and some of the treatment options shown in the videos on HealthChoicesFirst. Always talk with your health care practitioner about the information you learnt from the videos in regards to treatments and procedures the healthcare practitioner could perform and if they would be appropriate for you. Remember good information is the corner stone to understanding your condition or disease.

Please contact ( Dr. Alan Low, Pharmacist, Vancouver, BC ) to enquire if this health care provider is accepting new patients.

Education

Recent Health Talks Authored by Dr. Alan Low

  • Chicken Pox and Its Link To Shingles " Monica 51-years-old a new grandmother "

    Monica is 51-years-old and recently became a new grandmother. She received a call from her son telling her that her new and only granddaughter, Jane, had developed red spots and has been diagnosed with chicken pox at 12 months old. Jane did not receive the chicken pox vaccine, and after contracting chicken pox will no longer need the vaccine. Monica is excited to visit with her granddaughter and wants to spend time with her and her family and has been planning for this trip for months. Monica does recall having the chicken pox when she was a young girl and remembers it was an awful experience. This situation has raised a number of questions for Monica about the chicken pox, shingles and the shingles vaccine.

    Monica can have a consultation with her pharmacist who can help answer some of her concerning questions. For example, should Monica visit her new granddaughter and what are the risks and concerns? Monica wants to understand what causes shingles, and how the chicken pox and shingles are connected. Would visiting Jane cause shingles? Should Monica receive the shingles vaccine?

    Along with answering questions, pharmacists in several provinces in Canada are authorized to give the shingles vaccine and can administer the chicken pox vaccine to children aged 5 and older (check with your local pharmacist in your own province for specific criteria and requirements). The assessment and administration in pharmacies has been more convenient for many people compared to seeing their family doctor.

Recent Health Talk Comments by Dr. Alan Low

  • 03 May 2018
    About 90% of people born before 1995 have had chicken pox, and about one-third of these people develop shingles when they are older, generally at ages over 50. Although there has been a shingles vaccine available for many years, the uptake of the vaccine has been low in those who need it, around 30% received the vaccine (depending on what area is being measured). A new vaccine was introduced earlier this year which showed a very high effectiveness rate in clinical trials. The new vaccine, called Shingrix, in a study evaluating over 15,000 subjects who were aged 50 and up, found the vaccine reduced the number of people developing shingles from about 91 people per 10,000 to 6 people per 10,000 which is over a 90% reduction in the incidence of shingles. Those over 50 may want to speak with their healthcare professional about being vaccinated against shingles and discuss the benefits and risks of the new vaccine. Your pharmacist, in most jurisdictions, can provide not only information, but also the injection without the need for a prescription from your physician. If you have health insurance benefits which may cover the vaccine, you may require a prescription.
  • 192

    Dr. Alan Low

    , posted in: Osteoporosis Treatment
    21 February 2017
    Thanks Dr. Miller for pointing out how pharmacists can be of help to people with osteoporosis or interested in prevention of fracture (who are not diagnosed) with osteoporosis. Besides helping with drug related concerns, pharmacists can assist in determining the need and best choice of over the counter supplements and vitamins. There are many different types of calcium and vitamin D on the market now. Depending on what patients are also taking with respect to medications and other conditions, a particular calcium salt may be preferred and would be absorbed better. People who do not take 1200mg of elemental calcium per day from their diet (usually requires multiple servings of dairy products daily and/or calcium fortified foods), a calcium supplement to provide sufficient calcium to the body to keep bones health and help minimize the risk of fractures is needed. Vitamin D is necessary to help the calcium get from the digestive system to the circulation and bones. With the current weather in winter, it may not always be possible to get enough sun exposure to produce the amount of Vitamin D needed and Vitamin D supplements are necessary. A reasonable approach is to take 800IU to 1000IU of Vitamin D all year round to ensure sufficient levels of Vitamin D in the body, speak to your pharmacist or dietician about these essential elements and what is right for you.
  • 192

    Dr. Alan Low

    , posted in: Osteoporosis Treatment
    12 September 2016
    As mentioned, it is important to maintain a regular exercise program which is tailored to your abilities and needs. To help prevent fractures with osteoporosis, a person should optimize their stability to avoid falls. This can include exercise which strengthen the body as well as those which help improve balance. Ensure there is enough building block to allow the body to be stronger and improve balance also means that a good balanced diet should also be part of the care plan to prevent fractures due to osteoporosis. Speaking with your team of healthcare providers, identifying which ones can help with what aspect of prevention of fractures and treatment of osteoporosis is useful. For example, a dietician can assist with your diet, making a meal plan to ensure that you not only get enough of all the nutrients you need to help reduce the risk of fractures (eg. getting enough calcium in your diet as well as vitamin D from diet and/or sun exposure), but also enjoy what you eat. A physiotherapist or physical therapist can help with advice and recommendations on optimal exercises. A pharmacists can review your medications and osteoporosis treatment to ensure they are optimal and identify if any drug related concerns exist as well as help with any over the counter vitamin supplements to identify a calcium supplement (if it is needed) that is a good fit with your preferences and needs. Your physician can monitor your overall progress and regularly assess the improvement or progression of the condition over time. Alan Low
  • 16 December 2015
    Stress as been associated with the development of shingles, although the strength of the association is not strong, it could be just coincidental. Reducing stress is always a good thing and there are many approaches. There was a comment about wanting to know if there were vitamins which could help with reducing stress on the body, however, there are no reliable studies clearly demonstrating a direct benefit of vitamins and supplements to the body by reducing stress or making your body more "stress-proof". However, this assumes that your body has adequate levels of all the necessary nutrients and vitamins you require to maintain a normal homeostasis. One of the vitamins which have often been detected in the blood as being low is Vitamin D. This is sometimes called the "sunshine vitamin" because it is produced in the skin when exposed to sunlight. In certain parts of the world during winter months, there is insufficient exposure of the skin to sunlight by some people, especially those who are bedridden or in nursing homes, so that they may have low levels of Vitamin D. For those who are 50 years old and older can usually benefit from a Vitamin D supplement at a dose of 800 IU to 2000IU per day. Some experts recommend even higher dosages. Not that Vitamin D has been demonstrated to reduce the impact of stress on the body, but like any nutrient or vitamin, when there is a deficiency, the body is less able to cope with stress and illness. Maintaining a balanced diet and exercise program individualized to you is best, and sometimes requires the help of experts to help identify your individualized needs to ensure you maintain your health and productivity. If you do not have a balanced diet and your diet is deficient in certain vitamins, nutrients or minerals, then a supplementation of those may be necessary. Another example is if you do not normally consume 3 servings of dairy or more daily, you likely are not receiving your recommended intake of calcium and could benefit from a calcium supplement to maintain your bone strength and bone density to help prevent fractures and osteoporosis.
  • 16 December 2015
    As Chantal has mentioned, provincial plans do not cover the cost of the shingles vaccine currently.. However, if the person receiving the vaccine is part of a private health insurance plan, it is likely that it may be one of the covered treatments. Some private plans have retirees on the plan and they could benefit from the coverage for the shingles vaccine. As more data showing the benefits of the vaccine become available, the public plans may change the coverage. Health care payers must regularly evaluate a large number of new and existing drugs against comparators, looking at its efficacy, safety, effectiveness, cost, convenience and practicality in treatment. Because of the reality of a limited healthcare budget, not all treatments can be covered. Since coverage for medications and treatments is constantly changing, you should check with your pharmacist in your area who will be better informed of the coverage in your specific province. If you belong to a private plan, you may have to check with your plan provider to find out your particular coverage situation related to the vaccine.

Ratings for Dr. Alan Low, Pharmacist, Vancouver, BC

  • 5
    Information
    5
    Education
    5
    Local Services
    5
    Action Plan
    Dr. Low explained the drugs I am taking. Learned how to get more out of my treatments by taking them right.
    Submitted: November 02, 2017
  • 5
    Information
    5
    Education
    5
    Local Services
    5
    Action Plan
    Dr. Low is able to explain very complicated medical information at a basic level which makes it easy to understand. He is very knowledgeable, yet easy to talk to and understand. His consultative services are second to none.
    Submitted: November 17, 2016
  • 5
    Information
    5
    Education
    5
    Local Services
    5
    Action Plan
    Excellent pharmacist who helped me with a RA injection last year. Very well informed and educated.
    Submitted: February 03, 2016
  • 5
    Information
    5
    Education
    5
    Local Services
    5
    Action Plan
    Dr. Alan Low is a very well informed Pharmacist in Vancouver and I would highly recommend him to anyone looking for information on drugs or chronic condition's like Osteoporosis
    Submitted: January 15, 2016

Pharmacist Health Talks – Take a look at your local options in Vancouver

  • taylor allergic reaction
    A local pharmacist is a good option to consider when suffering from an Allergic Reactions. Often a local pharmacist can give you information or ideas to consider. Therefore start by seeing a local Pharmacist in Vancouver, BC, such as Dr. Alan Low.
  • the pill as a contraceptive choice
    Wondering about the Non-Contraceptive Benefits of the Pill? Your local pharmacist can provide you with information on male and female birth control. To find out more about the risks and benefits of your birth control, speak to a Pharmacist in Vancouver, BC, such as Dr. Alan Low.
  • bebb diabetes what is
    If you’re a Newly-Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Patient, you might feel overwhelmed by all of the new information coming from your family doctor and endocrinologist. An excellent resource can be a local Pharmacist in Vancouver, BC, such as Dr. Alan Low.
  • shingles treatment
    Many pharmacists can administer vaccinations, including the shingles vaccine. If you want to Prevent Shingles (Herpes Zoster) or find out more about shingles causes, symptoms and treatments, consult with a local Pharmacist in Vancouver, BC, such as Dr. Alan Low.

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This content is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.