Registered Dietitians

Practitioners By City

Premier Practitioners

Yumna Khan

Yumna Khan

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON
Alexis Williams

Alexis Williams

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON
Ms. Jaclyn Pritchard

Ms. Jaclyn Pritchard

Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Emily Campbell

Emily Campbell

RD
Registered Dietitian
Toronto, ON
Online Booking

Registered Dietitians

Sadia Badiei

Sadia Badiei

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Caitlin Boudreau

Caitlin Boudreau

RD, MPH
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Jadine Cairns

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Ms. Ashley Charlebois

Ms. Ashley Charlebois

CEP, RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Online Booking
Mrs. Ali J Chernoff

Mrs. Ali J Chernoff

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Natalie Choy

Natalie Choy

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Caroline Doucet

Caroline Doucet

B.Sc., RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Online Booking
Ali Eberhardt

Ali Eberhardt

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Sinead Feeney

Sinead Feeney

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Lynda Soberanes Garcia

Lynda Soberanes Garcia

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Charles Go

Charles Go

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Crystal Higgins

Crystal Higgins

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Whitney Hussain

Whitney Hussain

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Suzanne Kaye

Suzanne Kaye

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Vesanto Melina

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Jill Middlemiss

Jill Middlemiss

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Cristel Moubarak

Cristel Moubarak

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Lerin Oystryk

Lerin Oystryk

RD
Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Shallah Panjwani

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
Nicole Sherratt

Nicole Sherratt

Registered Dietitian
Vancouver, BC
1 - 20 of 31 results

A  local registered dietitian  has completed education and training to specialize in a wide variety of fields, including sport nutrition, gerontological nutrition, pediatric nutrition and renal nutrition. A local Registered Dietitian or she may work in private practice, in a nursing home, school, hospital or food service facility.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in North America. Heart disease refers to many conditions that affect the heart, including coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, heart attack, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias) and more.

Lifestyle Habits & Heart Disease

While there are some heart disease risk factors you can’t control, there are some you can, including diet and lifestyle. Up to 80% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented through your lifestyle habits. Eating a well-balanced diet can lower your cholesterol and blood pressure and help you lose weight. A diet low in saturated fat and high in fibre and plant food can reduce your risk of developing heart disease by:

• Improving your cholesterol and blood pressure levels 
• Controlling your blood sugar 
• Helping you maintain a healthy body weight 

If you have congestive heart failure, fluid retention is one of the biggest issues you face. You should aim to eat less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium daily - the average North American diet has about four to five thousand milligrams. Just as a diabetic would test their blood sugars every day to see how much insulin they need to take, a person with heart failure should be doing a daily weight check to monitor for fluid retention. Weigh yourself before breakfast and consult with your healthcare provider if you gain five pounds in a week or four pounds in two or three days.

Heart-Healthy Diet Tips

Here are some ways to ensure you’re eating a heart-healthy diet:

• Aim for 7-10 servings of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre.
• Avoid highly-processed foods such as fast food, deli meats and hot dogs. During processing vitamins, fibre and minerals are often removed while sugar or salt is added. 
​​​​• Incorporate more whole grain foods into your diet, such as brown rice, quinoa and whole grain bread. They’re rich in fibre, B vitamins and protein.
• Look for foods that contain unsaturated fat rather than saturated fat. Lower your trans fatty acid intake by avoiding foods with hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, shortening and margarine. 
• Make sure you’re getting enough protein to maintain heathy bones and muscles. Look for beans, fish, tofu and lean meat. 
• Stop drinking empty calories, which are found in fruit juices, energy drinks and soft drinks. They offer no nutritional value and can lead to weight gain. Choose water more often.

There are so many steps you can take towards a healthier heart, and diet is a big one. While it may seem daunting to change your eating habits, your heart will thank you!

Talk to your family physician if you'd like more information on nutrition contact your local registered dietician.

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