Ophthalmologists

Practitioners By City

Premier Practitioners

Dr. Shyam Patel

Dr. Shyam Patel

MD Cataract, Cornea, & Refractive Surgeon
Ophthalmologist
Fairfield, NJ
Dr. David Almeida

Dr. David Almeida

MD, PhD
Ophthalmologist
Erie, PA
Dr. Mark Fava

Dr. Mark Fava

Ophthalmologist
Hamilton, ON
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Dr. Varun Chaudhary

Dr. Varun Chaudhary

B.Sc., M.D.F.R.C.S.(C)
Ophthalmologist
Hamilton, ON

Ophthalmologists

Dr. Ghislain Andre Boudreault

Dr. Ghislain Andre Boudreault

Ophthalmologist
Calgary, AB
Dr. Hugh Jellie

Dr. Hugh Jellie

Book Online Appointments
Ophthalmologist
Kitchener, ON
Dr. Chryssa McAlister

Dr. Chryssa McAlister

Book Online Appointments
Ophthalmologist
Kitchener, ON
Dr. Bradley McCuaig

Dr. Bradley McCuaig

Ophthalmologist
Kitchener, ON
Dr. Dean Smith

Dr. Dean Smith

Book Online Appointments
Ophthalmologist
Mississauga, ON
Dr. Daniel Cormier

Dr. Daniel Cormier

Book Online Appointments
Ophthalmologist
Moncton, ON
Dr. Guillermo Rocha

Dr. Guillermo Rocha

MD FRCSC FACS
Ophthalmologist
Montreal, QC
Dr. Garfield Miller

Dr. Garfield Miller

Book Online Appointments
Ophthalmologist
Ottawa, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Selwyn Abel

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Robert Adam

Dr. Robert Adam

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Alaa Alali

Dr. Alaa Alali

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Asim Ali

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Filiberto Altomare

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Kenneth Axmith

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Minoo Azadeh

Dr. Minoo Azadeh

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Alan Berger

Dr. Alan Berger

MD, FRCSC
Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Catherine Birt

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Tanguy Boutin

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Shelley Boyd

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
HealthChoicesFirst practitioner

Dr. Rosa Braga-Mele

Ophthalmologist
Toronto, ON
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There are many eye conditions that may require surgery, including glaucoma, cataracts and retinal detachment. Your optometrist or ophthalmologist will help you understand more about surgical procedures and determine if you’re a candidate for a Corneal Collagen Cross-Linking

Types of Eye Surgery

Laser eye surgery: Laser refractive surgery or laser eye surgery to treat nearsightedess, farsightedness or astigmatism is constantly advancing. There are three types of laser eye surgery available: PRK, LASIK and SMILE. All three of these laser refractive surgeries reshape the front part of the eye called the cornea. 

Cataract surgery: A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye. Cataracts usually develop slowly, causing a painless and gradual decrease in vision as the lens of the eye prevents light rays from properly passing through. This outpatient surgical procedure involves your ophthalmologist making a small incision and using phacoemulsification (ultrasound) to remove the cataract. Generally, you’ll wear a synthetic intraocular lens (IOL) to help your replacement lens focus.

Glaucoma surgery: Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP). You may need surgery if other glaucoma treatments don’t work. Types of glaucoma surgery include laser treatments, trabeculectomy, tube shunt implantation, cyclophotocoagulation and MIGS (minimally invasive glaucoma surgery).

Strabismus surgery: If you have this condition, one eye looks at the object you are viewing, while the other eye is turned inward. In many cases, non-surgical treatments can correct strabismus. This eye surgery tightens or loosens the eye muscles for optimal alignment.

Vitrectomy: A pars plana vitrectomy treats problems with the retina or the vitreous (fluid in the eye). It may be used to treat retinal detachment, macular pucker, macular hole, diabetic retinopathy and certain eye infections and injuries.

Pneumatic retinopexy: An alternative to scleral buckling and vitrectomy for retinal detachment. Your ophthalmologist will use local anesthesia and inject a gas bubble into the eye. The bubble flattens the retina, and then a seal forms between the retina and the wall of the eye. You’ll need to keep your head in a certain position following the operation.

Scleral buckle: Often used for a retinal detachment. The operation involves securing a buckle to the wall of the eye, creating a scar with cryotherapy or laser to ensure that the retinal tear stays sealed, and usually draining the sub-retinal fluid.

Laser coagulation for diabetic retinopathy or macular degeneration: This eye surgery involves using a laser to cauterize ocular blood vessels to stabilize vision and prevent future vision loss.

Talk to your eye doctor if you'd like more information on eye conditions that may require surgery. 

The nation's leader in vision research.:The mission of the National Eye Institute is to eliminate vision loss and improve quality of life through vision research.

Visit HealthChoicesFirst.com for more videos and resources on eye diseases and surgery.

Print this Action Plan and check off items that you want to discuss with your healthcare provider

  • Laser refractive surgery or laser eye surgery to treat nearsightedess, farsightedness or astigmatism. There are three types of laser eye surgery available: PRK, LASIK and SMILE.

  • Cataract surgery involves your ophthalmologist making a small incision and using phacoemulsification (ultrasound) to remove the cataract. Generally, you’ll wear a synthetic intraocular lens (IOL) to help your replacement lens focus.

  • Types of glaucoma surgery include laser treatments, trabeculectomy, tube shunt implantation, cyclophotocoagulation and MIGS (minimally invasive glaucoma surgery).

  • A pars plana vitrectomy treats problems with the retina or the vitreous (fluid in the eye).

  • Scleral buckle surgery involves securing a buckle to the wall of the eye, creating a scar with cryotherapy or laser to ensure that the retinal tear stays sealed, and usually draining the sub-retinal fluid.

Adherence:
Adhering to your medications, prescribed exercises or lifestyle changes (such as dietary changes, smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, etc.) is essential to improving health outcomes successfully. Compliance to any prescribed treatment. A local ophthalmologist is a physician who specializes in the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system. Ophthalmology work with patients in the prevention of eye disease and injury. In treating patients an ophthalmologist may also educate them on eye care, glasses and contact lenses, glaucoma, oculoplastics, refractive surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, laser eye surgery, canaloplasty, cataract surgery, corneal transplant surgery and vitreo-retinal surgery.

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye. Cataracts usually develop slowly, causing a painless and gradual decrease in vision as the lens of the eye prevents light rays from properly passing through. Cataracts can affect both eyes or just one, and some patients experience mild symptoms, while others can barely see any shapes or movements. Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP).

Your eyes have clear liquid that flows in and out, but if you have glaucoma, this liquid doesn’t drain properly, causing this buildup of IOP pressure.Seeing a Local Ophthalmologist to treat Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve, which is made up of nerve fibers and transmits images from the eye to your brain.

Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP). Your eyes have clear liquid that flows in and out, but if you have glaucoma, this liquid doesn’t drain properly, causing this buildup of IOP pressure. Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve, which is made up of nerve fibers and transmits images from the eye to your brain.

The eye functions similar to a camera, where the light must be focused by a lens for us to see clearly. The lens inside our eye is clear when we are born but as we age, it can become cloudy and cause blurred vision or block light. This is known as a cataract, and everyone will develop it eventually, requiring surgery. 

The purpose of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society is to assure the provision of optimal eye care to all Canadians by promoting excellence in ophthalmology and providing services to support its members in practice.

While the thought of eye surgery can be daunting, cataract surgery is now one of the most commonly performed procedures worldwide with a high degree of safety. The procedure is fast and typically done as day surgery, where the cataract is broken down and removed through a micro incision. An intraocular lens or “IOL” is then inserted to focus light, with various lens designs available to suit individual needs. 

Complications are rare but post-operative appointments are important to catch and treat any issues early. The satisfaction rates after cataract surgery are high, with most patients experiencing positive changes in their vision and life.

Then a cataract develops, the lens becomes progressively clouded, leading to a gradual deterioration of vision. It can cause various visual symptoms, such as blurred or hazy vision, difficulty seeing in dim light, increased sensitivity to glare, and a noticeable reduction in color perception.

Pediatric ophthalmologists are medical and surgical doctors (Eye M.D.s) who specialize in the eye problems of children American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus

Cataracts can develop for several reasons, including aging, prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation, certain medical conditions like diabetes, long-term use of certain medications like corticosteroids, eye injuries, and genetic factors. However, the primary cause of cataracts is age-related changes in the proteins that make up the lens, leading to their clumping together and clouding the lens.

For more information about cataracts or laser refractive procedures, reach out to your local optician or ophthalmologist.

Eye surgery can be necessary for various conditions, such as glaucoma, cataracts, retinal detachment, and strabismus. Laser eye surgery is a popular procedure for correcting refractive errors like nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. There are different types of laser refractive surgeries available, including PRK, LASIK, and SMILE, which reshape the cornea to improve vision.

Cataract surgery involves removing the cloudy lens of the eye and replacing it with a synthetic intraocular lens (IOL) to restore clear vision. Glaucoma surgery may be required when other treatments fail to control intraocular pressure, and it can include various techniques such as laser treatments, trabeculectomy, tube shunt implantation, cyclophotocoagulation, and minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS).

Strabismus surgery aims to align the eyes by adjusting the eye muscles. Vitrectomy is a surgical procedure that treats conditions affecting the retina or the vitreous fluid in the eye, including retinal detachment, macular pucker, macular hole, diabetic retinopathy, and certain eye infections or injuries. Pneumatic retinopexy is an alternative method for treating retinal detachment by injecting a gas bubble into the eye to flatten the retina and promote healing.

Scleral buckle surgery is often used for retinal detachment and involves securing a buckle to the eye's wall to seal the retinal tear. Laser coagulation is a procedure used for diabetic retinopathy or macular degeneration, where a laser is used to cauterize ocular blood vessels to stabilize vision and prevent further vision loss.

It's important to consult with your eye doctor, whether an optometrist or ophthalmologist, to discuss these surgical procedures and determine if you're a candidate for them. They can provide more information about the specific conditions, treatment options, and address any concerns you may have with your cornea.

Remember, adherence to prescribed treatments and post-operative care is crucial for achieving optimal outcomes. Following your healthcare provider's instructions, taking medications as prescribed, and attending follow-up appointments are important steps in maintaining eye health and maximizing the benefits of surgery.

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