Local Ophthalmologists

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A local ophthalmologist is an eye doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of eye disorders and systemic diseases that manifest in eye symptoms. They perform both medical and surgical procedures on the eyes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at risk of developing diabetes-related eye conditions such as diabetic retinopathy. This disease is caused by damage to the blood vessels in the tissues of the retina. If you aren’t managing blood sugar levels properly, you’re at a higher risk of developing diabetic retinopathy. A local ophthalmologist can work with your local endocrinologist to create the optimal diabetes treatment plan for you to treatr diabetic retinopathy.

People often visit a Local Ophthalmologist to treat diabtes and eye condions. An ophthalmologist is a physician who specializes in Eye Care and Vision Testing the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system. So our first step in treating diabetic retinopathy is making sure a patient’s blood sugar is optimized, that whatever treatments they’re receiving for their diabetes in the systemic level are optimally managed,

As glaucoma progresses, it damages more and more of your optic nerve fibers, leading to vision loss. In many cases, people don’t know that they have glaucoma until they experience vision loss. While glaucoma can be controlled, it can’t be cured. With primary open-angle glaucoma, the fluid can’t effectively flow back out of your eye. Angle-closure glaucoma occurs when the iris of the eye closes off the drainage angle completely, causing an increase in IOP pressure and damage to the optic nerve. Acute angle-closure glaucoma is considered an emergency, as this sudden buildup of fluid causes an increase in IOP and can damage the optic nerve or lead to vision loss in a very short period of time. Unlike other types of glaucoma, acute angle-closure glaucoma causes symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and eye pain.

If you have a condition known as ocular hypertension, which is a result of high ocular pressure, your risk of developing glaucoma increases.Your optometrist or ophthalmologist may want to lower your IOP as a preventative measure. However, you don’t need to have high IOP to experience glaucoma. Normal-tension glaucoma causes damage to the optic nerve, even though the person’s IOP is normal. In this case, your eye health professional may recommend lowering your IOP to slow the progression of the disease.

Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP). Your eyes have clear liquid that flows in and out, but if you have glaucoma, this liquid doesn’t drain properly, causing this buildup of IOP pressure. As glaucoma progresses, it damages more and more of your optic nerve fibers, leading to vision loss.

Angle-closure glaucoma occurs when the iris of the eye closes off the drainage angle completely, causing an increase in IOP pressure and damage to the optic nerve.

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